Late Detection of Capitellar Osteochondritis Dissecans in a High School Football Player: A Case Report by Shari Benson, Former LSU Graduate Assistant

Shari Benson, former LSU Graduate Assistant, and currently in a fellowship with the Steadman Clinic, is presenting an Oral Case Study at this year's 62nd Annual NATA National Convention and Clinical Symposium in New Orleans, LA. Below is a brief overview of her case study. Be sure to attend the Convention to see Shari present the full Case Study. Yet another educational story and a reminder of how our LSU Alumni are contributing to the improvement of the health and well-being of athletes.

Late Detection of Capitellar Osteochondritis Dissecans in a High School Football Player: A Case Report

Abstract: Case report on a 17 YO football player at a rural high school who went misdiagnosed of R elbow OCD for 4 years. He had no MOI, but reported catching and locking with activity and was treated for lateral epicondylitis. A CT Scan revealed multiple loose bodies and moderate to severe damage to the articular surface of his capitellum. He underwent a R elbow synovectomy, loose body excision, and chondroplasty of his capitellum. He has now returned to sport without issues. The significance of this report is that OCD is commonly misdiagnosed in high school athletes, but is a common injury in adolescent football players and gymnasts. Due to the length of time this athlete went untreated, his lesion worsened to the point where he had 4 large loose bodies and significant damage to his articular cartilage, which makes him 50% more susceptible to having arthritis later in life. Most physicians are hesitant to operate on young athletes due to growth plate factors and their ability to heal non-operatively, however, untreated OCD is the leading cause of permanent elbow disability. Therefore, it is important to have the knowledge and clinical skill set to detect OCD early in adolescent athletes in order to avoid elbow arthritis and disability long-term.